Christina Robb



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photo by Martha Stewart     

Christina Robb was born in Washington, DC, and grew up in the suburbs of New York City and Albany, NY. Educated at Stanford University and at Somerville College of Oxford University, Robb turned from medieval studies to journalism after the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy broke the heart of her generation.

Robb was for more than two decades a cultural reporter and book critic for The Boston Globe and spent most of her Globe career writing for the paper's Sunday magazine. There, as early as 1979, she wrote articles about some of the dazzlingly creative women psychologists who were revolutionizing psychology by paying attention to relationships.



She continued to cover these groups and was surprised and moved by the intense involvement these stories evoked. In calls and letters, readers would describe how her article about this new psychology of relationships made them feel empowered or well-enough equipped with new skills to call parents or sisters or brothers or old but long-disconnected friends after years of silence or separation, to restart a foundering marriage or love relationship, or to break off a destructive one, encouraged by the people who supported and believed them.

The first readers of Robb's new book about this relational revolution in psychology, This Changes Everything, reported that it moved them enough to make them cry, or brought on especially vivid dreams that helped them reintegrate old hurts with new healing, or otherwise made them feel more alive and hopeful.

Robb was also one of five Globe reporters who wrote "War and Peace in the Nuclear Age," a special supplement that won the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting in 1983; her contribution to the section was about political resistance to nuclear arms. In 1992, when her two daughters were both in elementary school, Robb left The Globe and spent a year at the Bunting Institute of Harvard University, where she began her research for This Changes Everything.

She spent the years that followed shadowing experimenters, interviewing psychologists and their former clients, investigating critics, and reading an expanding literature of equal, mutual, empathic, growth-fostering, healing and re-connecting relationships - while spending enough time at home to be fully involved with fostering growth in her own family. Her children are now grown up, and she lives near Boston with her husband, who is an Episcopal priest and seminary professor, and with a dog and a rabbit by a stream in the woods. She is now at work on her next books.

This site is http://www.christinarobb.com
© 2007 by Christina Robb     Contact Christina Robb